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42 Quick-fire Tips for Parents of Aspiring Stars

Ready for some quick-fire tips? It’s fun to learn a lot and do it fast, so here’s a mish-mash of 42 tips for parents of aspiring stars. A compilation of key takeaways from our articles together with short & insightful pointers from our casting directors – this is the info you need to know.Β 

With everything from practical audition tips for your kid, to how to ROCK at being the parent or guardian of a child performer, this list has some essential do’s and don’ts you’ll need to keep in mind to help your child be their absolute best. Let’s dive right in.Β 

 

πŸ’‘Tip #1: Don’t wear white to on-camera auditions.
Why? White clothes burn the camera and don’t accentuate your kid’s features.

πŸ’‘Tip #2: You should never pay for a specific audition.
If the casting director or agent asks you to pay anything upfront, it’s probably a scam.

πŸ’‘Tip #3: Acting games are a wonderful & fun way to help your kid become a better actor.
Plus, it’s fun for the whole family.

πŸ’‘Tip #4: When learning lines, split them up into small chunks.
Learning a whole text is difficult, even for experienced actors.

πŸ’‘Tip #5: The headshot is the most important part of any submission.
If you want your kid to get cast, then, above all else, make sure the headshot is perfect.

πŸ’‘Tip #6: Don’t put make-up on your kid on audition day.

πŸ’‘Tip #7: Be respectful & kind to casting directors!
They’re not just auditioning your kid, they’re auditioning you, the parent, as well! They need to see that you’re easy to work with.

πŸ’‘Tip #8: Help your kid take up extra-curricular activities.
Special skills are very important, even for child actors and models, so make sure your kid has some in their arsenal.

πŸ’‘Tip #9: Never take photos on set, unless you’ve been given explicit permission.
You don’t want to step on any toes.

πŸ’‘Tip #10: Created a social media profile for your kid? Keep it secure!
Disable comments from strangers and don’t disclose too much personal info.

πŸ’‘Tip #11: Never ever show up late to an acting or modeling audition.
There’s a saying in ShowBiz – 15 minutes early is on time, on time is late. Live by it. That goes for online auditions too!

πŸ’‘Tip #12: Help your kid practice acting at home whenever you can.
Dry spell? Getting no gigs? Practice at home! Acting is like a muscle – need to train it to get better!

πŸ’‘Tip #13: YOU, the parent, are responsible for all the practicalities.
Don’t rely on your kid to, for example, bring their lines to the audition. You should do it.

πŸ’‘Tip #14: Don’t apply to far away auditions, unless you’re ready to make the trip.
Imagine your kid actually gets picked. What then? Will you drive 10 hours for a small-scale photoshoot?

πŸ’‘Tip #15: If you can’t make an audition, inform the casting director ASAP.
They won’t be pleased, but it’ll be infinitely better than being a no-show. Good relationships are key in the world of entertainment.

πŸ’‘Tip #16: Teach your kid (and yourself) not to take rejection personally.
There’s always stiff competition and even professional actors get way more “No”s than “Yes”es. That’s 100% normal.

πŸ’‘Tip #17: Practice makes perfect.
Being 100% prepared for an audition will leave a fantastic impression on casting directors + inspire confidence in your kid.

πŸ’‘Tip #18: Never use a filter for photos of your kid that you’ll send to casting directors.
They need to see what your kid looks like naturally. If they see a photo with a filter, it’s going in the trash.

πŸ’‘Tip #19: Don’t contact casting directors after you’ve submitted your kid.
If your kid gets the audition/part, they’ll get in touch. CDs have too many submissions to go through to get back to everyone!

πŸ’‘Tip #20: When going to an audition, or taking a headshot of your kid, avoid accessories.
No sunglasses, big necklaces, cute hats, funky bracelets… you need to keep the attention on your kid’s face.

πŸ’‘Tip #21: Dispel your kid’s nervousness before an audition with acting games.
They take your kid’s mind off the worries about the upcoming performance while helping prepare at the same time.

πŸ’‘Tip #22: Don’t ever scold or argue with your kid in front of the casting team.
Not only will you make it awkward for everyone involved, you’ll also come off as someone that’s impatient and difficult to work with.

πŸ’‘Tip #23: Try dressing your kid in light blue for auditions and headshots.
It’s the color that gets cast most often, because it’s calming and helps accentuate the person’s features.

πŸ’‘Tip #24: You don’t need professional headshots to get your kid started, take the photo yourself.
But you need to make sure it’s perfect – good lighting, clutter-free background, smiling kid, good quality.

πŸ’‘Tip #25: Update your kid’s headshot & details every few months.
Kids grow up fast. Don’t send out old photos to casting directors, when your kid looks completely different than they did 6 months ago.

πŸ’‘Tip #26: Have fun.
If every audition becomes a drag, if there’s no more joy in preparing for a role, if you want your kid to act & model more than they do, then there’s no point forcing it. Take a pause.

πŸ’‘Tip #27: Always bring water & snacks to an audition.
Oftentimes auditions have 100-200 hopeful families waiting in line. If you have to wait for hours and don’t have supplies, you’re going to have a bad time.

πŸ’‘Tip#28: Apply your kid to as many gigs as you can.
There’s lots of competition and landing a job is a numbers game. Improve your chances by applying everywhere you can.

πŸ’‘Tip #29: Sign your kid up to the local theatre club!
Your kid will get experience, education, and meet people with similar interests. Plus, it’s a great addition to their resume.

πŸ’‘Tip #30: Self-taping for an audition? Invest in a tripod.
Nothing worse than a shaky cam footage or having your phone fall over mid-way the perfect self-tape take.

πŸ’‘Tip #31: Help your kid develop a clear speaking voice by playing tongue twisters.
An actor’s voice is one of their most essential tools – keep it sharp by training it regularly.

πŸ’‘Tip #32: Before you audition your infant make sure they’re clean, fed, rested, and happy.
That’s it – the rest is in their tiny hands πŸ™‚

πŸ’‘Tip #33: Reflect on the audition.
Did your kid stutter too much? Was too shy? Too nervous? That’s fine, mistakes are fantastic. But you need to learn from them. So discuss with your kid – how will you make the next audition even better?

πŸ’‘Tip #34: Find a child actor role model for your kid.
Nowadays, famous child actors are active on social media and put out a lot of educational and inspiring content. Hearing tips from someone their age they admire can help your kid absorb valuable info.

πŸ’‘Tip #35: Celebrate going to an audition!
Even if you don’t get the part, an audition is a step closer to stardom and an invaluable experience worthy of celebration.

πŸ’‘Tip #36: Make sure your kid understands that they don’t have to be perfect.
It’s normal to mess up! Perfectionism can have an adverse effect – your kid can freeze up and become nervous if something’s not going well. Embrace mistakes.

πŸ’‘Tip #37: Don’t expect more from your kid than you do from yourself.
You want them to practice and learn lines all evening? Do it together.

πŸ’‘Tip #38: When starting out, take advantage of unpaid gigs.
They’re easier to get, but your kid will still get the audition & filming experience. It’s a great way to understand early on if acting/modeling is something your kid will enjoy.

πŸ’‘Tip #39: Make sure your kid knows basic acting terms before an audition/filming.
If the casting director says “Action” and your kid looks at you confused, it won’t sit well with the CD.

πŸ’‘Tip #40: Don’t pester casting directors with unprofessional questions.
Don’t ask how other kids did, if your kid got the role, or about their weekend. Practical questions, like “where should I sign in?” are fine.

πŸ’‘Tip #41: Let your kid be themselves at the audition.
One of the main things casting directors seek in a kid is personality. If your kid is 100% focused on just delivering lines, their awesome selves won’t shine through.

πŸ’‘Tip #42: Dress your kid in comfortable clothes for an audition.
Wearing cozy and familiar clothes can help your kid feel relaxed and at ease in an otherwise intimidating environment.

 

A lot of these tips are covered in-depth in our other articles, so if you’re looking for more info, don’t hesitate to explore the KidsCasting Academy.Β 

Got an essential tip parents need to know? Share it below in the comments!

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